BLINK Realty Group | Arlington Real Estate, Medford Real Estate, Reading Real Estate


After you accept an offer on your house, it is only a matter of time before you need to move out. This means a home seller will need to start packing up his or her belongings and figure out which items need to stay and which items need to go.

Ultimately, it often pays to leave high-quality items behind as part of a home sale. And if you include top-notch items as part of a home listing, you may be better equipped than other home sellers to receive multiple outstanding homebuying proposals.

Determining which items to leave behind as part of a home sale can be simple. In fact, here are three of the most common items that home sellers choose to offer in a home listing:

1. Refrigerator

If you intend to move into a house that already has a refrigerator, there may be no need to bring your current refrigerator to your new address. Thus, you can include your current refrigerator as part of your home listing.

A refrigerator that looks and performs great may be worth several hundred dollars. Therefore, this appliance could become a key part of a tight negotiation with a homebuyer and may help you move closer to finalizing a home sale agreement.

Of course, if you include your refrigerator in your home listing, you also won't have to worry about moving this big, heavy appliance to your new address.

2. Washer and Dryer

Your washer and dryer have helped you keep your clothes clean and dry for many years. Now, these appliances may prove to be exceedingly valuable to a homebuyer who wants to avoid the hassle of shopping for a new washer and dryer.

If possible, it may be worthwhile to include a washer and dryer in a home listing. Plus, you can include information about the age and condition of your washer and dryer to help your home listing stand out from others.

3. Big-Screen TV

A big-screen TV that served as the centerpiece of your living room or man cave may be tough to move. Thankfully, you can include this item in a home listing and make it simple for a homebuyer to enjoy a wonderful TV as soon as he or she buys your house.

Determining which items to leave behind as part of a home sale sometimes can be tough. Fortunately, if you work with a real estate agent, you can get expert assistance as you put together a home listing.

A real estate agent is happy to provide comprehensive support throughout the home selling process. He or she will learn about your home and help you craft a home listing that highlights your house's features. In addition, a real estate agent will set up home showings, respond to your home selling concerns and questions and much more.

When it comes to selling your house, don't hesitate to leave various first-rate items behind. By doing so, you may be able to make your home more attractive to potential homebuyers and boost your chances of a fast home sale.


That time is coming if it is not already here. The kids are gone, and it is just the two of you—or, maybe there’s only one of you—and you feel like you’re rattling around the house like a couple of beans in a can. You’re tired of cleaning rooms that you never use. You’ve stopped visiting the basement, and you pretend that it isn’t even there. But you have no idea what things you should consider in purchasing that next “smaller” house. All you’ve ever planned for is that perfect house for the family, so … here are some things to consider.

If you’re still young physically, it’s hard to imagine not being able to do the things you have always done. Unfortunately, time does take its toll. 

Steps and doors...

Consider that you might want to find a single-story place with a master bedroom and maybe one guest room. That would seem simple enough, but unfortunately, not all single-level homes are created equal. The number one challenge as people get older is managing stairs. When you put “no step” in the equation, all the sudden you start to see how many steps are in many single-level homes. For example, there may be steps up to the front door, steps from the garage into the house, single steps from the dining room to the living room, a step into the bathroom, etc. Now you begin to wonder if the architect had “steps” on the brain. 

When buying your family home, you may not have even thought about doors, but there is the possibility of one day needing to use a walker or being in a wheelchair. Now, those standard doorways are a problem. Medical needs might limit you to exiting only through the front door—the only 36-inch door in the house. Oh yes, and there might be steps to get out that way as well. 

Fixed income...

The second challenge that happens as people get older, besides health challenges, is having a limited budget. In most cases, it’s fixed to your retirement income. So, it’s not just about the house payments. Even if you pay cash for your home, you still have gas, electric, and water bills. Take time understanding what those bills currently are, and determine if those will fit your budget. Then, decide if there's your room in your budget for them to up because you know that nothing goes down in cost. 

Time and effort...

Another consideration is lot size. You may really love to work outside in the garden or to have a garden that looks beautiful—even if someone else does the gardening. That is all well and good, but you should consider that there may come a time that it is too big or too costly to maintain. Do you want to move again because you cannot afford to keep up the yard or pay for all the water needed to keep it green? If you live in areas of the country that have lots of snow or ice in the winter, how much of the front walkways can you keep clean so you can come and go? If it is a large front yard with a long driveway and long sidewalks it may be more than you can handle.

These challenges are only a few of the things to consider when downsizing. Let your real estate professional know your needs now … and in the future.


If you intend to sell your house, it pays to get expert support throughout the home selling journey. In fact, if you hire a real estate agent, you can put various home selling myths to rest.

Ultimately, there are many home selling myths that you may hear before you list your house. If you take these myths to heart, you may struggle to prepare for the home selling process.

Let's take a look at three common home selling myths, and the problems associated with these myths.

1. Selling a house is a quick, seamless process.

The process of selling a house often can be long and complicated, particularly for a first-time home seller. Fortunately, if you hire a real estate agent, you can reduce the risk of encountering home selling hurdles.

A real estate agent will learn about you and your home selling goals. Then, this housing market professional will offer recommendations about how to promote your residence to the right groups of buyers and maximize your house's value.

Furthermore, a real estate agent is available to respond to questions at each stage of the home selling journey. He or she will guide you along each stage of this journey, and as such, help you identify and resolve problems before they escalate.

2. What you originally paid for your house matches what it is worth today.

The real estate market fluctuates constantly. Thus, what you initially paid for your house is unlikely to match what your residence is worth today.

A real estate agent can help you evaluate housing market data to better understand how your residence stacks up against the competition. That way, you'll be better equipped than ever before to establish a competitive price for your residence.

Also, a real estate agent may recommend that you complete a home appraisal. This appraisal will enable you to receive a property valuation to help you determine the optimal initial asking price for your home.

3. There is no need to make home improvements, because a buyer will make home upgrades after finalizing a purchase.

When it comes to selling a house, it pays to go above and beyond the call of duty. Therefore, if you complete myriad home improvements before listing your house, you can increase the likelihood that your home will stand out to potential buyers.

Take some time to examine your residence both inside and out. If you identify any major problems, you should fix these issues immediately. Because if you fail to do so, you may miss out on opportunities to stir up interest in your house.

A real estate agent generally can provide recommendations about home upgrades. This housing market professional may even be able to put you in touch with the best local contractors who can help you upgrade your residence in no time at all.

Don't fall victim to the aforementioned home selling myths. Instead, work with a real estate agent, and you can get the help you need to quickly and effortlessly navigate the home selling cycle.


Not all smart home devices are created equal. If you wind up paying a high price for a smart home gadget you do not need, you risk wasting precious time and resources.

Fortunately, there are lots of things you can do to make informed smart home device purchases, such as:

1. Consider Your Smart Home Device Needs

The needs of one property owner for a smart home device may vary from those of another.. If you consider how you can use different smart home devices, you can boost the likelihood of making smart home gadget purchases that will serve you well for years to come.

For example, if you find your electricity bills are on the rise, investing in smart light bulbs may prove to be a great choice. These light bulbs can help you optimize your house's electricity consumption and lower your electricity bills.

On the other hand, if you are concerned about home security, a smart house security system may be an excellent investment. This security system can help you simultaneously safeguard your residence against theft and lower your home insurance rates.

2. Perform Comprehensive Research

New smart home devices are becoming available every day, and as such, determining which ones are right for your house sometimes is difficult. If you perform in-depth research into the smart home devices at your disposal, you could find gadgets that you can enjoy day after day.

Conduct online research into assorted smart home devices – you will be happy you did. Once you learn about different smart home gadgets, how they work and their benefits, you can choose the right devices for your residence.

Also, it may help to consult with family members and friends as you assess myriad smart home devices. If a family member or friend recently purchased a smart home device that works perfectly, for instance, you may want to consider buying the same gadget for your house.

3. Evaluate Your Budget

As more smart home devices are released, the prices of various smart house gadgets are falling accordingly. Yet it is still crucial to evaluate your budget closely before you make smart home device investments. If you understand exactly how much money you can spend on smart house devices, you can take steps to get the most out of your available finances.

Don't forget to shop around for smart home devices, too. Online and brick-and-mortar retailers occasionally offer sales on smart home gadgets. Thus, if you search far and wide for smart home devices that fall in line with your budget, you could avoid spending too much to acquire top-notch smart house gadgets.

As you get set to invest in smart home devices, it generally pays to be diligent. If you take an informed approach to smart home device shopping, you can find gadgets that will deliver long-lasting benefits. Best of all, you can use assorted smart home devices to lower your electricity costs, secure your residence and much more.


You always want to be safe in your new home, but bringing home a new baby brings your safety protocol to a whole new level. In the first few months of life, the baby won’t be getting into too much trouble. By the time the baby can crawl, however, it’s a whole different story. This is why you want your home prepared before the baby even gets there. You should keep your home free of hazards. No more boxes in the way on the floor. The glass coffee table may need to be put away for a time. The nature of your home will certainly change once your little bundle of joy arrives. Below, you’ll find some of the most basic baby safety measures that you can take around your home in order to bring it from normal home to “baby proof.”


You’ll want to look at your home from the level of a child. Anything that you feel he or she could get into when you’re on the floor on your hands and knees is fair game.


Lock Drawers And Cabinets


Both drawers and cabinets should be locked in the bathroom, kitchen, even in your office. You never know what a baby can get himself into! This is especially important for drawers and cabinets that have sharp objects like knives, scissors, or tools. Any cabinets that have chemicals, heavy pans, or anything else you don’t want a child getting into should have a lock on them. Locks for cabinets are available in both the interior style or exterior style safety lock. Both types of locks can be easily installed in cabinets and drawers in order to prevent children from opening them, yet giving the adults in the house continued access to the things that they need. 


Outlet Covers


These small plastic fittings come in a variety of types and styles. Some insert into the outlets themselves while others cover the entire outlet plate. Some snap onto the outlet while others open like a door. You’ll want to choose a type of outlet cover that will work best for your needs. You don’t want an inconvenience when you do use the plug and you also don’t want a lot of small plastic pieces hanging around the home to be just another hazard to your child. 


Gates


Gates are one of the most valuable safety items that parents can install for their kids. Gates can be installed in doorways where the child shouldn’t have immediate access. These safety measures are also important at the bottom and top of each stairway in the home. Baby gates come in all shapes and styles, so you’ll want to decide what works best for your needs in the home. Some gates are mountable while others are detachable and portable from room to room. Some gates even have extension pieces that are available to be installed along with them to fit rooms of all sizes. 


Bumpers


Bumpers get their name because they prevent exactly what the name states-bumping! You’ll want to put these bumpers and corner guards to cover any rough or sharp edges around your home. Consider covering the following areas of your home:


  • Fireplaces
  • Counters
  • Coffee tables
  • Wood stoves

 Anything with a sharp corner or edge needs to be covered to prevent your child from injury.    


Baby Proofing can be a difficult task, but with the right tools, you’ll be able to protect your precious little one from harm around your other big investment- your home.